lunes, 23 de abril de 2018



Photography: Stefano Mori

lunes, 3 de noviembre de 2014

Didi Shirt

Photography: Michael Obex
Styling: Max Marzinger
Model: Sabrina Schumacher
Make-up: Bernadette Krejci
Photo Assistenz: Christian Joaning  







Didi Skirt


Photography: Michael Obex
Styling: Max Marzinger
Model: Sabrina Schumacher
Make-up: Bernadette Krejci
Photo Assistenz: Christian Joaning  



THE COLLECTION STORY 

FAMILY PATTERNS








In rural Bangladesh a woman gets one sari per year from her family on occasion of the main Muslim or Hindu festival. A man gets one lungi, which is a piece of cloth wrapped around as skirt. When the saris and lungis are worn out, they are traditionally recycled into blankets: about six layers of those cotton saris are fixed together with hundreds of stitches made by hand.  
EACH BLANKET REFLECTS A FAMILY HISTORY 

Photography: Michael Obex
Styling: Max Marzinger
Model: Anna Pia Rauch and Serafin
Make-up: Bernadette Krejci
Photo Assistenz: Christian Joaning  

Over the years with everyday use, the surface layers of the blankets peel off and the hidden layers appear. The vibrant and incredible colourful textured surface is an imprint of its own little family cosmos. These textiles form the basis of this project.

In another recycling process through the excellent craftsmanship of many women around the villages of Rudrapur and Birgonj these fabrics are turned into clothes in contemporary design.



LEARNING FROM EACH OTHERS



Photography: Michael Obex
Photo Assistenz: Christian Joaning


In Bangladesh the continuation of this extraordinary textile culture will be facilitated by the appreciation that will be revived through Didi Textiles. For our parts in the world there might be even more to learn: In a way the project can be seen as an attempt to turn the usual trade flow upside-down. Normally the Global North is producing it´s jeans and t-shirts in the Global South. Once worn out the clothes are sent back, often with the result of destroying local cultures and markets. With Didi textiles the worn-out clothes are sent in a high quality from the Global South to the North leaving us with the question how to value our everyday culture. For us in the industrialized countries these textiles can be an inspiration and motivation towards the art of recycling and craftsmanship as well as strengthening the sensibility to discover the beauty in the used and ordinary.
THE LABEL



Didi Textiles clothes are strong in their individuality. They don`t follow a short-term fashion trend. We hope the pieces will be worn over a long time span of years rather than the usual fashion period of weeks. The uniqueness of the textiles, the fairness of the production as well as the emotions linked to the process is the new pride. The bond to the women producing the clothes is reflected in our label, which is the signature of the woman working on that shirt.
URBAN-RURAL INTERVENTION






























The majority of Bangladeshis live in rural areas. Rudrapur, which stands for many villages in Bangladesh shows how people are able to build their habitat with their own resources: using their hands, local mud and bamboo. They produce food and many daily goods themselves. The neighbourhoods have developed over generations and social networks are strong. Women feel comfortable to be outside, children enjoy their village as a fantastic and safe playground. Elderly people find places to keep watch over a goat and to chat under a tree.

But there is a lack of jobs. This is why people leave their villages.

From all around the country people move to the urban textile production hubs.
They leave their own homes in the villages to stay in rented rooms.
They pay for childcare, for water, for sanitation, for transportation.

Women don`t feel safe in public areas.

There is another way; an alternative which avoids the pressure caused by the demand for mass-produced clothes.
Didi Textiles are designed for a decentralized production in the village.

FASHION SHOOTING IN VIENNA














Photography: Michael Obex
Styling: Max Marzinger
Model: Sabrina Schumacher
Make-up: Bernadette Krejci
Photo Assistenz: Christian Joaning